Where to Place Your New Aquarium

Building a new aquarium is exciting for families, allowing you to stock it with interesting and unusual breeds of fish as well as plants!  The main concern people have however, is finding the most appropriate location within their home to place their new tank.  There are a few things to consider when placing your new tank.

  1. No direct heat source – it is important to keep your tank away from sunlight and heat sources such as fireplaces, radiators etc.  The heat can affect the life of the fish!
  2. Sturdy cabinet – you must place your tank on a purpose built aquarium cabinet, as these are strong enough to support the weight of a fully stocked tank.  Just using a table or shelf will not always be strong enough!
  3. Away from dangers – you need to keep things like cables, electricity points and pets away from your new tank!

Where Trout Feed in a River

One thing beginning fly fishermen struggle with their first time on a trout stream is locating where fish are feeding. It’s not the pattern, cast, or the retrieve that gets them in trouble, it’s the presentation and figuring out how to get that fly in the strike zone. Here’s a look at the four basic feeding zones on a typical trout stream and what percentage of the time you can generally find fish there. You might be surprised to find trout feed under the surface 90 percent of the time.

On the Surface

Trout rarely feed on the surface, hitting insects in the surface film no more than 10 percent of the time. It will be evident fish are feeding on the surface when you see boils at the surface, hear fish slurping bugs off the top or even jump out of the water to haul in adult aquatic insects as they emerge. This is a common sight in the evenings when mosquitoes are prevalent at the water’s edge.

Just Below the Surface

Same goes for the immediate subsurface bite, or the first two or three inches below the surface. Trout consume about 10 percent of their diet here as well, snacking on adult insects as they make their way to the surface. Dry flies will still work at this stage, although switching to a light nymph like a pheasant tail is probably a better idea.