Fly Fishing for Bass – a Guide

Dry flies, wet flies, nymphs, streamers: almost all of them were devised to catch trout.

Thankfully, almost all of them catch bass, too.

Most fly-fishing is conducted in pursuit of trout in streams, where fly-fishing gear is perfect for tossing feather-light imitations of aquatic insects, crustaceans or baitfish onto or into the currents. In many places, this activity peaks in the spring and declines during the heat of summer. Trout are cold-water fish and just don’t bite very well when the water gets up around 70 degrees.

Once the water warms, many trout anglers switch to bass, which don’t mind 70-degree water a bit.

Despite their status as Plan B fish – something to fish for when the trout fishing’s no good – bass are great fish for fly-fishing.

It’s not unusual for a trout fisher to think he or she has hooked a large trout, only to find out the fish is a small bass.

They are accessible. Many streams that are trout fisheries in their cooler, upper reaches are great bass fisheries downstream. So the same river where you fished the Hendrickson hatch in May might provide exciting bass fishing in July. Smallmouth and largemouth bass are widely distributed across the U.S., and almost everyone has good bass water nearby. Bass generally don’t prefer truly cold water, but in places with water temperatures in the 60s, they often coexist with trout.