Where to Place Your New Aquarium

Building a new aquarium is exciting for families, allowing you to stock it with interesting and unusual breeds of fish as well as plants!  The main concern people have however, is finding the most appropriate location within their home to place their new tank.  There are a few things to consider when placing your new tank.

  1. No direct heat source – it is important to keep your tank away from sunlight and heat sources such as fireplaces, radiators etc.  The heat can affect the life of the fish!
  2. Sturdy cabinet – you must place your tank on a purpose built aquarium cabinet, as these are strong enough to support the weight of a fully stocked tank.  Just using a table or shelf will not always be strong enough!
  3. Away from dangers – you need to keep things like cables, electricity points and pets away from your new tank!

Feeding fish in an aquarium

Not sure what you should feed your fish? Is it a meat-eater, or a vegetarian? This list of feeding types will answer that question for you.

Carnivores

Carnivores are meat-eating fish. Some prefer live prey that they can hunt down and kill before eating, such as other fish or insects. Here are some common carnivorous fish, and what they prefer to eat.

 

Hatchetfish – Prefers live foods but will accept freeze dried and flake foods.

Killifish – Eats small live foods, can be trained to accept flakes.

Knifefish – Eats live foods exclusively

Halfbeak – Prefers live foods, but will eat flakes.

Frontosa – Accepts all types of meaty foods.

Electric Catfish – Prefer live foods, but can be trained to accept freeze dried tablets.

Bettas – Prefers live foods but will accept flakes and freeze dried.

Banjo Catfish – Prefers live foods, but can be trained to accept freeze dried tablets.

Archerfish – Eats live foods exclusively.

Herbivores

Herbivores require a diet of all, or mostely, vegetable matter. True herbivores do not have a large stomach, and therefore must eat more frequently. These fish are primarily vegetarian, and should be fed accordingly.

Molly – Algae-eater that also eats vegetables such as spinach. Will also accept insects and flakes.

Farowella – Eats vVegetable tablets and algae.

Pacu – Prefers fresh vegetables, will eat vegetable flakes and fruits.

Silver Dollar – Feed fresh vegetables, vegetable flakes and tablets.

Tropheus – Acccepts algae, plants, spirulina, vegetable flakes.

Taking Children On Your Next Fishing Trip

If you have ever taken children on a fishing trip with you, only to find it is a complete disaster and not at all fun, this post is for you!  It is possible to keep your child’s attention and catch enough fish to make it enjoyable for the whole family.

Begin with the right fishing equipment.  There is no point in getting silly little kids fishing rods – you’ll end up spending more time untangling the thing than actually using it!  Simply go for an ultra-light rod and reel.  Get the shortest one you can, but not less than 5 feet.  A spool of good quality line and some torpedo style flotats will be good.  Get someone at your local tackle shop to spool the reel for you and attach the float so that it can slide along the line to the desired length.

Find a good pond to fish at.  It is a good idea to go for one which is quiet, kids can get quite excitable with casting and you don’t want to annoy too many others!

A Guide to the Fish within UK Waterways

There are a range of different fish which are native to the UK waterways.  Here is a guide to the different species you might find!

Carp: carp are found in the majority of UK canals and can grow to large sizes.  They are easy to spot due to their dark brown and bronze colouration.  They have a large, rounded body and strong fins.  There are three major strains.  The common carp are fully scaled, mirror carp are partially scaled and learther carp have practically no scales at all!

Roach: the roach makes up the largest numbers of fish within our canals.  Roach are a shoaling fish, silvery grey in colour.  They are often confused with Rudd.  You can be sure by counting the lateral line scales (rudd have 40-55) and check the shape of the mouth – rudd have upturned mouths.

Pike: the pike is a spectacular predator! They have large, bony heads with upward looking eyes, a broad, flat snout and large mouth.  They have a lot of sharp teeth! A torpedo shaped body allows for speedy movement!

You can find out more about fishing within our canal network over at the canal and river trust.

 

Fishing in the Spring Time: Tips for New Fishermen

The spring is a great month to get out and about on the water, so here are our top tips for making the most of the new season.

The number 1 rule in spring is to simply get out on thwe water as much as you can!  There is a wonderful saying that even the worst fishing day is better than no fishing day at all!    You should also keep a close eye on the weather report – days of unexpected warmth or sunshine are good opporunities to get out and go fishing.

Whilst out, keep looking for the sunnier spots.  The cold water will warm up quickly once the sun brightens up in spring, so more fish will be attracted to the warmer shallows.

Use smaller, more brightly coloured lures during spring, when the water can be muddier or murky.  This helps the fish to see them better, and the smaller lures will seem like less of an effort to chase around.

How to Stop Pond Water Turning Green

Green pond water is a common complaint, especially during the summer months.  The reason pond water goes green is because of a growth of algae.  Pond algae feeds on the nitrates produced when bacteria break down fish waste, and sunny conditions can make algae grow very quickly indeed.

The main ways to prevent the spread of algae is to remove the fish waste, by scooping out the sludgey layer at the bottom of the pond, and by using algaecides which are chemicals to kill off the algae.  These chemicals are dangerous to use when you have pets and children however, so do be careful!  You will need to read the instructions carefully, and check if your pond fish will need to be moved into a temporary home while their pond is being treated.  Some chemicals could harm your fish.

What exactly is spey fishing?

One of the most fun and interesting developments in fly-fishing in recent years has been the rise of fishing with two-handed rods – widely known as Spey fishing.

Most fly-fishing, of course, is done with a rod designed to be casted with just one hand. And most of the time, that single-hand rod is used for “overhead” casting – flinging the line back behind the caster to flex the rod, then flinging it forward over the water to deliver the fly.

The trouble is, there isn’t always room for a back cast. And salmon and steelhead rivers tend to be big, requiring long casts to seek out the fish.

Spey casting makes it possible to throw a long line with very little room behind the caster, because there’s no back cast. Instead, the caster flips the line into position on the water in front of him, then swings the rod back and makes a simple forward cast. It’s not as easy as it sounds – there’s a learning curve – but once you get the hang, you can send 100 feet of line sailing smoothly out over the river.

All About Perch – Species Info Guide

The scientific name for Perch is Perca fluviatilis.  Perch have an expected maximum weight of around 7lb (that’s 3.2kg).  The average weight is normally around 6-8oz which is 170-228g.  They can grow up to 20in (50cm) in length and live for around 13 years.

The British Record perch was caught in 1985 weighing in at 5lb 9oz (2.523kg), somewhere in Kent!

The perch is a stripy predatory fish which, when still young will attack anything small enough to fit in it’s mouth. As perch grow older they become a lot more wary, making a themselves much harder to catch. Its unique looks allow it to be easily recognisable. Its body is green with several black stripes, enabling it to have excellent camouflage in its watery lair of weeds and reeds. It’s not a fast swimmer like the pike, but it can go at reasonable speed for long periods.

Perch are hunters, preying on other species in the water. The babies feed on water fleas and other tiny crustaceans but they soon graduate to insect larvae such as bloodworms. If small enough fish are available, perch switch to a mainly fish diet when they weigh about 113g (4oz). Young perch hunt in schools, lying in wait among water plants until small fish such as bleak or roach stray too close. The school then sets off in pursuit, harrying the quarry until it is too tired to swim further. Perch catch their prey by biting the tail repeatedly from behind and below to restrict swimming. Characteristically the perch always captures and swallows its prey tail first. Yum!